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10 Questions

10 Questions for Ruvanee Pietersz Vilhauer

- By

"When the package arrived on Monday morning by overnight FedEx, a disturbance ensued. Mr. Rodrigo made an agitated phone call in his glassed-in sanctum, looking in turns horrified, elated, and apprehensive."
—from "Mr. Rodrigo's Identification Company", Spring 2018 (Vol. 59, Issue 1)

 

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
I have a vague recollection of a poem I wrote, back in Sri Lanka, when I was about ten. It must have been inspired by Robert Frost’s "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening". I don’t recall having Frost’s poems at home, so maybe I discovered them in a book in the Colombo library or at...


10 Questions

10 Questions for Juan Meneses

- By Abby MacGregor

Like vegetation that finds
shelter in so many territories
I swell around the house
surge from your insides when
you feel death coming
—from “That Which Is Only Visible When the Wind Brings It”, Fall 2018 (Vol. 59, Issue 3)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you translated.
Some years back I co-translated a short story by Spanish author Jesús Fernández Santos titled “Although I Don’t Know Your Name” (“Aunque no sé tu nombre”), which appeared in The Coffin Factory. One of the most interesting parts was the conversations I had with my co-translator—the negotiations, the choices, the concessions that each party made the other. They focused on the meaning of words...



10 Questions

10 Questions for Allison Hutchcraft

- By Abby MacGregor

Say it.
To smooth a section of one’s hair
as if in an unsurfaced
convulsion.
—from “In the Other Window”, Fall 2018 (Vol. 59, Issue 3)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you translated.
With my co-translator Juan Meneses, I first translated “Two Poems about Poverty,” from Concha García’s 2008 collection, Acontecimiento...


10 Questions

10 Questions for GennaRose Nethercott

- By Abby MacGregor

“A ru­mor states that if you wait there for the devil, you can trade your soul in exchange for otherworldly guitar chops or a booming dentistry career or a lifelong tropical vacation. Those down-and-out enough are prone to superstition. They’ll believe just about anything. They’ll even believe that your average Sorbis is Satan himself. . .” —from “Fifty Beasts to Break Your Heart”, Fall 2018 (Vol. 59, Issue 3)

Tell us about one of the first pieces you wrote.
If we’re talking genuine firsts, I do have a glittery Lisa Frank...


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